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  1. page Wikis edited WIKIS teachweb2 - Glogster http://teachweb2.wikispaces.com/Glogster This wiki includes links an…
    WIKIS
    teachweb2 - Glogster
    http://teachweb2.wikispaces.com/Glogster
    This wiki includes links and examples of Glogster, what it is and how to use it in educational settings. The wiki includes the positives and negatives (the strengths and weaknesses) of Glogster. This site also includes two YouTube videos of how to use Glogster. Glogster allows users to create interactive posters which include pictures, text, video, and music. The uses for this technology in the library could include using Glogster to create an interactive poster promoting the library, posted on the library web page. Glogster would have particular appeal to middle school and high school students. One could also use Glogster to create student projects in any subject area. Another use, provided in one of the YouTube videos, was to use Glogster as a center. The teacher-librarian includes instructions on the Glog of what the student is expected to do. This site can be referred to when setting up a Glog because of the precise how-to instructions given in the YouTube video.
    Shelley Scott

    Wikis
    http://webtools4u2use.wikispaces.com/--Wikis+to+Share
    (view changes)
    10:44 pm
  2. page Games edited ... This technology has been used in math classrooms to teach math content and problem solving ski…
    ...
    This technology has been used in math classrooms to teach math content and problem solving skills on the middle school/pre-algebra level. The math is embedded in a story line that engages students in an eerie world where monsters want world domination, gained by stealing people's pets, and leading the unsuspecting pet owner on a journey. Some monsters are totally new and invented for the game, while others are rooted in various world mythologies.
    Students prevent monster domination by playing the game and solving the puzzles, and rescuing their pets.
    ...
    pre-algebra curriculum.
    Levels
    Levels progress from
    ...
    a room.
    Lure of the Labyrinth can be played as a full-fledged game or its puzzles can be played as separate,standalone activities. The game operates best when teams of students collaborate. In game mode they can use the TPC (Tasti Pet Communicator) to communicate with other team members and score points. Teachers have administrative privileges over the game so they can set up teams and watch their communications.
    Graphic novel sequences get players started in the game, give them important game instructions and motivate their journey through the strange world. "Lure" starts out like this......
    ...
    http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/library/learning.php
    Diane Gorman
    During their Lure of the Labyrinth game play, students will be able to use the TPC to share all kinds of information with their teammates. However, since all variables in the puzzles are randomly generated each time a student plays a Lure of the Labyrinth puzzle (the questions are always different so the answers are always different), students will not be able to share answers in the game. What they will be able to do, though, is to chat about problem-solving strategies. And we hope that you'll strongly encourage your students to use the TPC for this purpose.
    The TPC is also students' link to a vast amount of game information. They will receive messages there about the rooms they are to visit. They can also
    Review any of the graphic novels they have encountered in the game.
    Review the biographies of any monsters they have met in the game
    Change their profile.
    DIANE GORMAN

    
    
    (view changes)
    7:54 pm
  3. page Social Networks edited ... This site can be used by librarians, students, everyone, to get a feel for a book. If a book h…
    ...
    This site can be used by librarians, students, everyone, to get a feel for a book. If a book has a lot of decent reviews and a good rating then it is worth looking into a little more to see if it should be added to the collection.
    It can also be used as a Mashup example or reference for the librarian when the librarian wants to possibly add a Mashup page on the library site. It gives a good feel for what a Mashup can really do.
    Kevin Loeffler
    (view changes)
    7:48 pm
  4. page Games edited ... In the world of Lure of the Labyrinth, students progress through three sections, or "wing…
    ...
    In the world of Lure of the Labyrinth, students progress through three sections, or "wings." Each is related to a different math strand that is part of a the typical pre-algebra curriculum.
    Levels progress from easy to hard. And, continuing with the "rule of three," students have to successfully solve each puzzle three times before they can eliminate a room.
    (Because of the use of a graphic novel format the program also supports reading instruction.)
    Lure of the Labyrinth can be played as a full-fledged game or its puzzles can be played as separate,standalone activities. The game operates best when teams of students collaborate. In game mode they can use the TPC (Tasti Pet Communicator) to communicate with other team members and score points. Teachers have administrative privileges over the game so they can set up teams and watch their communications.
    Graphic novel sequences get players started in the game, give them important game instructions and motivate their journey through the strange world. "Lure" starts out like this......
    (view changes)
    7:39 pm
  5. page Games edited ... Amy Dykes LURE OF THE LABYRINTH http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/library/learning.php {h…
    ...
    Amy Dykes
    LURE OF THE LABYRINTH
    http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/library/learning.php{http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_1_2.jpg} {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_3.jpg}
    http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/library/learning.php

    HOW THE TECHNOLGY HAS BEEN USED AND INCORPORATING THE TECHNOLOGY INTO AN EDUCATIONAL SETTING (Math classes):
    This technology has been used in math classrooms to teach math content and problem solving skills on the middle school/pre-algebra level. The math is embedded in a story line that engages students in an eerie world where monsters want world domination, gained by stealing people's pets, and leading the unsuspecting pet owner on a journey. Some monsters are totally new and invented for the game, while others are rooted in various world mythologies.
    ...
    solving the puzzlespuzzles, and rescuing
    ...
    typical pre-algebra curriculum:
    Proportions (including fractions and ratios)
    Variables and Equations
    Number and Operations (including geometry, order of operations and modular arithmetic)
    curriculum.
    Levels progress from easy to hard. And, continuing with the "rule of three," students have to successfully solve each puzzle three times before they can eliminate a room.
    (Because of the use of a graphic novel format the program also supports reading instruction.)
    ...
    played as separate, standaloneseparate,standalone activities. The
    ...
    other team members.members and score points. Teachers have
    ...
    strange world. Lure of the Labyrinthit"Lure" starts out like this ...this......
    Your beloved pet's gone missing and you've got to find it - but how? Before you know it, you're dropped - a little like Alice through the looking glass - into a strange (and extremely smelly) world where your only friend is a mysterious bean-loving girl with wings. She calls herself Iris, and she says there are others ... Others? Other pets? You're not sure yet. But she tells you that you'll need a disguise if you have any hope of finding your pet. You don your new, exceedingly bizarre disguise, take some beans from Iris (beans?) and find your way to a place called the Tasti Pet Factory. What's going on here? You're not sure, but you do know that the whole dump is overrun with monsters. They're all over the place, stinking up the joint and sending you to the Horrible Resources Department where they sign you up to work for them. They seem to make pet food here ... sometimes out of ingredients like carrots and eyeballs! You're not sure how any of this is going to help you find your pet, but you go along with it (since it's really the only option you've got). And eventually some things become clear. At each stage of your journey, your work in the factory involves solving puzzles that feel a little like math ... only different. And after awhile, you understand that you're being paid at these "jobs" (that is, solving the puzzles) in tokens ... tokens that might prove
    SCHOOL LIBRARY USE AND INCORPORATING THE TECHNOLOGY INTO AN EDUCATIONAL SETTING (the library):
    ...
    f. sharing strategies for solving the puzzles develops communication about learning that enables students to solidify and deepen learning.
    
     {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_4.jpg}
    http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/library/learning.php

    Diane Gorman
    
    
    (For anyone interested in the game besides my description given above, I love the graphic novel style)
    STEPS IN THE GAME:
    
    1. They'll navigate to //Lure of the Labyrinth// URL (we recommend that you bookmark computers with this address, write it on the board or give each student a separate piece of paper with the URL on it for easy access).
    2. They'll enter their user name and password (which you have assigned them. If you haven't done this yet, just follow the steps here.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_1_2.jpg}
    3. They'll choose their game pet and confirm that they will adopt the animal.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_3.jpg}
    4. They'll begin to engage with the game story by reading Lure of the Labyrinth's first graphic-novel sequence, "Into the Pipe." Students can navigate through thegraphic-novel sequences by using the arrows that appear halfway down the leftand right sides of the screen while rolling over those areas with the mouse.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_4.jpg}
    5. They'll customize their game avatar by giving it a name, mask, and color from a set of pre-selected options.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_5.jpg}
    6. They'll read the next graphic-novel sequence, "Enter the Factory."
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_6.jpg}
    7. They'll arrive in the Tasti Pet Factory Waiting Room. As in the other areas of the game, students will be able to move their avatars here by clicking on the various parts of the screen. The avatars will follow the clicks.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_7.jpg}
    8. They'll have to figure out how to get out of the Tasti Pet Waiting Room. Students will need to do some experimentation to make it happen, but the process will ultimately go like this - they'll click on the skeleton to get the correct badge number; they'll then click on Funzlebubb (the big guy blocking the door) and be headed out of the Waiting Room.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_8.jpg}
    9. They'll arrive in the Foyer of the Tasti Pet Factory. They'll also receive their first message in their TPC (Tasti Pet Communicator) at this point. This message will include a map with clues on how to get to their first puzzle room (and the content of the clues will relate to the wing where the room is; i.e., if the room is in the Proportions wing, students will have to use their understanding of proportions to decipher the clues).
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_9.jpg}
    10. They'll have to figure out how to get out of the Foyer before they can use the map to find that first puzzle room. Again, this will be a case of trial and error, but the ultimate process will go like this - they'll move their avatars toward the top of the Foyer; they'll then move across one of the bridges and click on one of the three doors to enter a corresponding wing of the Tasti Pet Factory.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_10.jpg}
    11. They'll now be in the corridors of the wing that they've entered. They can again access their first map via their TPC (always available in the top right-hand corner of the screen) and use the clues to find their first puzzle room. (They can also randomly click on all the puzzle rooms in the wing until they find the one to which they have access; we think, however, that most students would see that as a very tedious process and that they'll prefer to use the maps.)
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_11a.jpg}
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_11b.jpg}
    12. They'll navigate the corridors and click on what they believe to be their first puzzle room (based on their map). If they've chosen the right room, they'll be led to a graphic-novel sequence about that room and then into the room itself to play the puzzle. If they haven't chosen the right room, they'll have to return to the corridors until they do eventually find the right room.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_12a.jpg}
    From this point forward, your students will be able to use information from their TPCs, the graphic-novel sequences, and their own experimentation to move through the game, score points and succeed in Lure of the Labyrint

    During their Lure of the Labyrinth game play, students will be able to use the TPC to share all kinds of information with their teammates. However, since all variables in the puzzles are randomly generated each time a student plays a Lure of the Labyrinth puzzle (the questions are always different so the answers are always different), students will not be able to share answers in the game. What they will be able to do, though, is to chat about problem-solving strategies. And we hope that you'll strongly encourage your students to use the TPC for this purpose.
    The TPC is also students' link to a vast amount of game information. They will receive messages there about the rooms they are to visit. They can also
    (view changes)
    7:36 pm
  6. page Social Networks edited ... This website allows you to create free interactive posters. The posters can include any inform…
    ...
    This website allows you to create free interactive posters. The posters can include any information that you would like. In a library and/or educational setting, your students can create posters online to display a research project, a piece of writing, an art design, the alphabet, etc. The list can continously grow because you can create a poster for just about anything. I have found that students learn and remember things more often if they are presented in a different way other than a powerpoint. Other gloggers can comment on the posters and rate them. This website allows your students a non-traditional way of expressing themselves. I think it would be a neat idea to have your students create an online poster to describe themself. They could share them with the class as a "get to know you" activity. The second link above provides a variety of applications in an educational setting.
    Shannon Hinsey
    Social Network/MashUP
    http://www.librarything.com/work/3577382
    I like the Librarything website. When you find a book like Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, the page that comes up is a Mashup of a lot of things. It shows tags, Librarything recommendations, members recommendations, member reviews, publisher and news media reviews, external references, member descriptions, publisher descriptions, member ratings, book covers, plus a lot more. All this is mashed on the page to give the viewer a lot of different sources of information. To me it is like the old Siskle and Ebert movie reviewers. I tended to agree with one guy but seldom the other. Well, with all the members giving reviews you can get a feel for what the non-professional reviewer thinks of the book and not rely on a few professional reviewers.
    This site can be used by librarians, students, everyone, to get a feel for a book. If a book has a lot of decent reviews and a good rating then it is worth looking into a little more to see if it should be added to the collection.
    It can also be used as a Mashup example or reference for the librarian when the librarian wants to possibly add a Mashup page on the library site. It gives a good feel for what a Mashup can really do.

    (view changes)
    7:13 pm
  7. page Games edited ... PBS Kids is great site for early elementary aged students to use to learn various information.…
    ...
    PBS Kids is great site for early elementary aged students to use to learn various information. It utilizes the characters off of their favorite Public Broadcasting Channel shows and the characters guide the students through the instructions and playing the games. There are different levels of difficulty so it caters to higher achieving students and students that may need to work a little slower. The variety of games covers everything from attacking antibodies with Sid the Science Kid to Bingo with AlphaPig. You can even pick the games by subject instead of by character and as you scroll over the game links, the topics covered in the game are displayed in the top corner. This site has so many options that it would be good for home or school use. In the classroom, the games would be really great for letter recognition and review. Some of the concepts introduced can help students understand harder subjects they may have covered in classes, like how a virus is killed in the body with one of Sid's games. The games make understanding the concepts much easier because they have participated in the learning.
    Amy Dykes
    LURE OF THE LABYRINTH
    http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/library/learning.php
    HOW THE TECHNOLGY HAS BEEN USED AND INCORPORATING THE TECHNOLOGY INTO AN EDUCATIONAL SETTING (Math classes):
    This technology has been used in math classrooms to teach math content and problem solving skills on the middle school/pre-algebra level. The math is embedded in a story line that engages students in an eerie world where monsters want world domination, gained by stealing people's pets, and leading the unsuspecting pet owner on a journey. Some monsters are totally new and invented for the game, while others are rooted in various world mythologies.
    Students prevent monster domination by playing the game and solving the puzzles and rescuing their pets.
    In the world of Lure of the Labyrinth, students progress through three sections, or "wings." Each is related to a different math strand that is part of a the typical pre-algebra curriculum:
    Proportions (including fractions and ratios)
    Variables and Equations
    Number and Operations (including geometry, order of operations and modular arithmetic)
    Levels progress from easy to hard. And, continuing with the "rule of three," students have to successfully solve each puzzle three times before they can eliminate a room.
    (Because of the use of a graphic novel format the program also supports reading instruction.)
    Lure of the Labyrinth can be played as a full-fledged game or its puzzles can be played as separate, standalone activities. The game operates best when teams of students collaborate. In game mode they can use the TPC (Tasti Pet Communicator) to communicate with other team members. Teachers have administrative privileges over the game so they can set up teams and watch their communications.
    Graphic novel sequences get players started in the game, give them important game instructions and motivate their journey through the strange world. Lure of the Labyrinthit starts out like this ...
    Your beloved pet's gone missing and you've got to find it - but how? Before you know it, you're dropped - a little like Alice through the looking glass - into a strange (and extremely smelly) world where your only friend is a mysterious bean-loving girl with wings. She calls herself Iris, and she says there are others ... Others? Other pets? You're not sure yet. But she tells you that you'll need a disguise if you have any hope of finding your pet. You don your new, exceedingly bizarre disguise, take some beans from Iris (beans?) and find your way to a place called the Tasti Pet Factory. What's going on here? You're not sure, but you do know that the whole dump is overrun with monsters. They're all over the place, stinking up the joint and sending you to the Horrible Resources Department where they sign you up to work for them. They seem to make pet food here ... sometimes out of ingredients like carrots and eyeballs! You're not sure how any of this is going to help you find your pet, but you go along with it (since it's really the only option you've got). And eventually some things become clear. At each stage of your journey, your work in the factory involves solving puzzles that feel a little like math ... only different. And after awhile, you understand that you're being paid at these "jobs" (that is, solving the puzzles) in tokens ... tokens that might prove
    SCHOOL LIBRARY USE AND INCORPORATING THE TECHNOLOGY INTO AN EDUCATIONAL SETTING (the library):
    1) The game can be used as a means of luring math classes to the library given enough computers. Math classes are the least likely to use the library as part of their instruction.
    2) The use of team games in the library has been suggested in our readings. They a. foster collaboration and the development of social skills.
    b. help students develop their problem-solving skills and systems thinking
    c. help students use the scientific method of gathering information and making and testing hypotheses until they find the solution to a problem,
    d. required repetition once reinforces learning
    e. encourages students to develop repeatable strategies rather than guessing
    f. sharing strategies for solving the puzzles develops communication about learning that enables students to solidify and deepen learning.
    
    Diane Gorman
    
    
    (For anyone interested in the game besides my description given above, I love the graphic novel style)
    STEPS IN THE GAME:
    
    1. They'll navigate to //Lure of the Labyrinth// URL (we recommend that you bookmark computers with this address, write it on the board or give each student a separate piece of paper with the URL on it for easy access).
    2. They'll enter their user name and password (which you have assigned them. If you haven't done this yet, just follow the steps here.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_1_2.jpg}
    3. They'll choose their game pet and confirm that they will adopt the animal.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_3.jpg}
    4. They'll begin to engage with the game story by reading Lure of the Labyrinth's first graphic-novel sequence, "Into the Pipe." Students can navigate through thegraphic-novel sequences by using the arrows that appear halfway down the leftand right sides of the screen while rolling over those areas with the mouse.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_4.jpg}
    5. They'll customize their game avatar by giving it a name, mask, and color from a set of pre-selected options.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_5.jpg}
    6. They'll read the next graphic-novel sequence, "Enter the Factory."
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_6.jpg}
    7. They'll arrive in the Tasti Pet Factory Waiting Room. As in the other areas of the game, students will be able to move their avatars here by clicking on the various parts of the screen. The avatars will follow the clicks.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_7.jpg}
    8. They'll have to figure out how to get out of the Tasti Pet Waiting Room. Students will need to do some experimentation to make it happen, but the process will ultimately go like this - they'll click on the skeleton to get the correct badge number; they'll then click on Funzlebubb (the big guy blocking the door) and be headed out of the Waiting Room.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_8.jpg}
    9. They'll arrive in the Foyer of the Tasti Pet Factory. They'll also receive their first message in their TPC (Tasti Pet Communicator) at this point. This message will include a map with clues on how to get to their first puzzle room (and the content of the clues will relate to the wing where the room is; i.e., if the room is in the Proportions wing, students will have to use their understanding of proportions to decipher the clues).
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_9.jpg}
    10. They'll have to figure out how to get out of the Foyer before they can use the map to find that first puzzle room. Again, this will be a case of trial and error, but the ultimate process will go like this - they'll move their avatars toward the top of the Foyer; they'll then move across one of the bridges and click on one of the three doors to enter a corresponding wing of the Tasti Pet Factory.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_10.jpg}
    11. They'll now be in the corridors of the wing that they've entered. They can again access their first map via their TPC (always available in the top right-hand corner of the screen) and use the clues to find their first puzzle room. (They can also randomly click on all the puzzle rooms in the wing until they find the one to which they have access; we think, however, that most students would see that as a very tedious process and that they'll prefer to use the maps.)
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_11a.jpg}
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_11b.jpg}
    12. They'll navigate the corridors and click on what they believe to be their first puzzle room (based on their map). If they've chosen the right room, they'll be led to a graphic-novel sequence about that room and then into the room itself to play the puzzle. If they haven't chosen the right room, they'll have to return to the corridors until they do eventually find the right room.
    {http://labyrinth.thinkport.org/www/images/screenshots/first_12a.jpg}
    From this point forward, your students will be able to use information from their TPCs, the graphic-novel sequences, and their own experimentation to move through the game, score points and succeed in Lure of the Labyrint
    During their Lure of the Labyrinth game play, students will be able to use the TPC to share all kinds of information with their teammates. However, since all variables in the puzzles are randomly generated each time a student plays a Lure of the Labyrinth puzzle (the questions are always different so the answers are always different), students will not be able to share answers in the game. What they will be able to do, though, is to chat about problem-solving strategies. And we hope that you'll strongly encourage your students to use the TPC for this purpose.
    The TPC is also students' link to a vast amount of game information. They will receive messages there about the rooms they are to visit. They can also
    Review any of the graphic novels they have encountered in the game.
    Review the biographies of any monsters they have met in the game
    Change their profile.
    DIANE GORMAN
    
    
    
    
    The TPC is also students' link to a vast amount of game information. They will receive messages there about the rooms they are to visit. They can also
    Review any of the graphic novels they have encountered in the game.
    Review the biographies of any monsters they have met in the game
    Change their profile.

    (view changes)
    7:02 pm
  8. page Social Networks edited ... As a media specialist I would create a page for the school that contains the links included by…
    ...
    As a media specialist I would create a page for the school that contains the links included by this librarian as well as others that relate directly to academic and extracurricular content. I would take advantage of the iread app that could be greatly beneficial to teachers of all subjects for informal assessment or projects.
    Jessica Tilley
    Social Network:
    Glogster
    http://www.glogster.com/
    http://edu.glogster.com/
    This website allows you to create free interactive posters. The posters can include any information that you would like. In a library and/or educational setting, your students can create posters online to display a research project, a piece of writing, an art design, the alphabet, etc. The list can continously grow because you can create a poster for just about anything. I have found that students learn and remember things more often if they are presented in a different way other than a powerpoint. Other gloggers can comment on the posters and rate them. This website allows your students a non-traditional way of expressing themselves. I think it would be a neat idea to have your students create an online poster to describe themself. They could share them with the class as a "get to know you" activity. The second link above provides a variety of applications in an educational setting.
    Shannon Hinsey

    (view changes)
    1:12 pm

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